an English translation of the novel

Page 229-230

“…in the year 2011 of the Gregorian calendar, scientists conclusively documented the existence of psychokinesis, which until that point had always been a considered an occult phenomenon,” the false minoshiro explained dispassionately.

Its voice gave off the impression of a cultured, intelligent woman, and although it was a mesmerizing voice, it sounded almost too perfect, and thus inhuman.

“Before that, whether it was in public or in laboratories, all PK experiments were complete failures. However, in the Republic of Azerbaijan in 2011, cognitive scientist Imran Ismailov conducted successful experiments in the capital city of Baku. In quantum mechanics, there is a well known paradox of an observed particle affecting another particle, but Ismailov was the first to predict that the microscopic world being magnified to a macroscopic event applied to PK as well. Those doubtful of the success of Ismailov’s experiments were recruited to act as observers with the latent ability to resist PK. {After going through several trials, they were subdivided into various groups so that no observer knew the entire scope of the experiment. These observers were then asked to conceal certain facts from someone who knew of Ismailov’s experiment design. There were multiple control factors…}”

The five of us listened entranced to the false minoshiro’s lengthy speech. Even though we couldn’t even understand a fraction of what it was talking about, we drank up its words like plants after a drought.

Until now, our knowledge of the world was like a jigsaw puzzle missing the most important piece. The false minoshiro’s words were giving us the missing piece, slaking our curiosity.

But we never imagined that we would be hearing about a story so hellish that it would leave our hair standing on end.

“…the first person Ismailov discovered with extrasensory perception, Nona Mardanova, was a nineteen-year-old girl. All she was able to do was move a light plastic ball sealed within a transparent tube, but like a seed crystal that prompts a chemical solution to nucleate, she was the catalyst that awakened mankind’s latent power.”


2 Responses to Page 229-230

  1. Hello, it’s me again. I just reached this part today and I hope you don’t mind me commenting on how I understand it.

    {After going through several trials, they were subdivided into various groups so that no observer knew the entire scope of the experiment. These observers were then asked to conceal certain facts from someone who knew of Ismailov’s experiment design. There were multiple control factors…}

    Observers who doubted the results of the experiment would suppress the use of PK and significantly affect the experimental results. Ismailov reduced that possibility as much as possible, such that no one observer could grasp the entire experimental design; simultaneously he didn’t allow those who understood the experiment (including himself) to know when and where the experiment was carried out, thus creating a double-blind experiment.
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/double-blind+study -> a double-blind experiment guards against experimenter bias and placebo effects.

    This follows the observer effect in that those who doubted the existence of PK, if they knew the whole design, would expect to observe a failure and thus cause the failure. Simultaneously, Ismailov and those who believed in the existence of PK would believe in the success of the experiment and cause the result they expect to observe, if they knew it was being carried out, so they were not allowed to know the details.

    For page 242-244, I’m not sure if Empress Airin’s name should be a title as well, since none of the other monarchs were referred to by name, and Airin in the translation I have can be read as both a name or a title meaning “Empress of Love/Affection”. Although since I don’t know how the original goes, I’m making a guess here.

    • Oh I get it. Some of the people who participated in the experiments were themselves probably very weak or latent PK-users. Since some of these people thought that the experiment was bullshit, they themselves were unconsciously preventing a positive result from occuring (e.g. if the experiment was to move a ball using your mind, they’d be unknowingly using their PK to prevent it from moving in the first place). By preventing people from knowing what the experiment was about and how it worked, Ismailov prevented the non-believers from inadvertently affecting the results.

      Since he was able to gather concrete and objective proof that it exists, people all around the world will now be less likely to deny its existence, thereby lessening the subconscious effect preventing PK from existing/affecting physical objects.

 
     

Leave a Reply